Tag Archives: vSphere

Need the vSphere Client? VMware Has You Covered.

One of the more popular posts, currently in third place, on vNinja.net is my list of vSphere Client direct download links posted back in March 2012.

Thankfully William Lam had the same idea, and got a new Knowledgebase Article published: Download URLs for VMware vSphere Client (2089791). Please use that article as the official download link documentation from now on.

Perkins-Tryon High School Graduation 2010 (c) Paul Robinson

VMware Certified Professional Recertification

VCP5VMware has announced a Recertification Policy for it’s VMware Certified Professional program, effective as of March 10, 2014.

In short, it means that you are no longer a VCP(x) for life, but need to recertify every 2 years, unless you take a VCAP exam during the same period. If you do not upgrade your certification, your VCP status is revoked. For all the details, have a look at Recertification Policy: VMware Certified Professional.

It also means that anyone currently holding a VCP certification, needs to recertify before March 10th 2015, regardless of when the initial VCP was obtained.  Those obtaining a VCP after March 10th, will have to recertify within two years of obtaining the initial VCP.

I think this is a good move, and is on par with other technical certifications like ones offered by HP, Cisco and CompTia (A+). After all, we live in an ever evolving technical market where continuous change happens and if you are not able to keep current, the certification holds no real merit.

This change from VMware also means that as long as you recertify your VCP exam within the two year period, there will not be a course requirement to upgrade; schedule your exam and you are ready to go. Previously you would get a grace period, after a new major release of vSphere, where you could re-certify without having to attend a new class. With this change, you have two years, and that is it.

In a way, this also means that VMware will have to commit to major releases, with upgraded VCP versions, more frequently than every 2 years.

Looking at the last two vSphere releases, this seems to indicate a change in release cycles for major versions:

  • vSphere 4 was released  May 21st 2009.
  • vSphere 5 was released July 12th 2011
  • vSphere 5.5 was released September 22nd 2013.

Remember, vSphere 5.5 is covered by the VCP5 (ok, there is a VCP510 and VCP550 version) certification, so if this policy was in place in 2011 when vSphere 5 was released, there would not be any upgraded VCP certification to take within the two year validity period.

Update:What if VMware had called an old VCP certification “retired” instead of “expired”, would that cause less outrage and emotion?

Header image used under Creative Commons License (c) Paul Robinson

IMG_3811

Automatically Name Datastores in vSphere?

William Lam posted “Why you should rename the default VSAN Datastore name” where he outlines why the default name for VSAN data stores should be changed. Of course, I completely agree with his views on this; Leaving it at the default might cause confusion down the line.

At the end of the post, William asks the following:

I wonder if it would be a useful to have a feature in VSAN to automatically append the vSphere Cluster name to the default VSAN Datastore name? What do you think?

The answer to that is quite simple too; Yes. It would be great to be able to append the cluster name automatically.

But this got me thinking, wouldn’t it be even better would be to use the same kind of naming pattern scheme we get when provisioning Horizon View desktops, when we provision datastores? In fact, this should also be an option for other datastores, not just when using VSAN.

Imagine the possibilities if you could define datastore naming schemes in your vCenter, and add a few variables like this, for instance: {datastoretype}-{datacentername}-{clustername/hostname}-{fixed:03}.

Then you could get automatic, and perhaps even sensible, datastore naming like this:

local-hqdc-esxi001-001
iscsi-hqdc-cluster01-001
nfs-hqdc-cluster01-001
fc-hqdc-cluster01-001
vsan-hqdc-cluster01-001 

And so on… I’m sure there are other potentially even more useful variables that could be used here, perhaps even incorporating something about tiering and SLA´s (platinum/gold/silver etc.) but that would require that you knew the storage characteristics and how it maps to your naming scheme when it gets defined. But yes, we do need to be able to automatically name our datastores in a coherent matter, regardless of storage type.  

After all, we’re moving to a model of policy based computing, shouldn’t naming of objects like datastores, also be ruled by policy, defined at a Datacenter level in vCenter?
(wait a minute, why 
don’t do the same for hosts joined to a datacenter or cluster?)