Installing and configuring VMware vCenter Operations

VMware vCenter Operations was released to the general public a week or so ago and is available for download right now. As usual you can download a 60 day trial, and get started immediately.

Like other recent management utilities from VMware, vCenter Operations comes in the form of a .OVF template (like vCMA/vMA).

Installing VMware vCenter Operations

Download VMware vCenter Operations and import by starting vCenter Client, navigate to the “File” menu and select “Deploy OVF template…

Browse to the download location, and find the “VMware-vcops-1.0.0.0-373027_OVF10.ova” file. Select it and click open.

Click on “Next” and review the details.

Hit “Next” once more, and click on “Accept” to accept the VMware EULA and enable the “Next” button.

Specify the name and location of the VMware vCenter Operations VM, and click “Next” to continue.


Now we get to select which host or cluster the VM should be deployed to. Make your choices, and click on “Next

Select your preferred resource pool, if you have any, and once again click “Next

Now select your preferred datastore, and guess what? We get to click “Next” one more time!

Decide if you want a thin or thick provisioned VM, the default is thick but I went with thin provisioned in this particular setup.

The last configuration item, for now, is to map the networks. Select your network mappings and click on “Next”.

Review the final setup screen, and once you are satisfied that your settings are correct, click on “Finish” to start the OVF template import.

The import starts, and after a few minutes it should be ready to go!


Success!

Time to start it up!

Configuring VMware vCenter Operations

After the vCenter Operations VM has finished booting, it displays a little information screen showing the IP address and other tidbits of information. The most important piece of information right now is the DHCP assigned IP address. Make a note of that IP for later.

To make sure we don’t run into problems with time synchronization we need to make sure that the vCenter Operations VM time is synchronized with the ESX host time. To do so, right click on the VMware vCenter Operations VM inside of the vCenter Client, select “Edit Settings”.

Select the “Options” tab, and find the VMware Tools section.

Find the “Synchronize guest time with host” option, and select it.

Open the vCenter Operations web page in a browser, and log in. The default username/password for vCenter Operations is admin/admin

Log in, and follow the directions on screen to change the default username/password.

The new password must be at least 8 characters, and at least one digit and one character.
Note: This also changes the root account password for the vCenter Operations VM.

Next up is configuring the vCenter Operations connection to the vCenter.

Fill out the vCenter Server information form, with information pertinent to your infrastructure.
Note that the registration credentials needs to have administrator privileges on the vCenter Server. You can use the same credentials for both registration and collection, or you can differentiate them if required in your environment.

Click on “Save“, and a test is performed to make sure that the information provided is correct.

If registration is successful, a new popup appears explaining that you need to use the vSphere Client to assign the vCenter Operations licenses.

Click on “Ok” and the vCenter Operations setup dashboard appears in your browser.

Go back to your vCenter Client and navigate to the “Home” screen.

You should now see the new “vCenter Operations” icon under “Solutions and Applications”. If it does not appear immediately, close the vCenter Client and restart it to have it pick up the installation.
To install the vCenter Operations license, go to “Home” and find the “Licensing” icon.

Click on it, and change the “View by:” option to “Asset
Right click on “vCenter Operations” and select “Change License Key

Select “Assign new license key to this solution”, click on “Enter Key…” and enter your license key and optionally a label for the key. Click on “OK” to return to the “Assign License” window, and click on “OK” again to install the license.


Your license should now be installed and active.

Go back to the vCenter Client “Home” screen and find the vCenter Operations icon under “Solutions and Applications”. Click on it, and vCenter Operations should already be active monitoring your infrastructure.

Thats it! You now have VMware vCenter Operations running in your environment. For details on how it works and reports your operations refer to the VMware vCenter Operations official documentation. Eric Sloof has also posted a couple of great videos in his VMware vCenter Operations – Troubleshooting Workflow post that gives an in-depth overview of what VMware vCenter Operations is capable of doing.

Connect

Christian Mohn

Chief Consultant at EVRY Norge AS
Written by Christian Mohn.

Christian is the owner of vNinja.net and a vSoup.net Virtualization Podcast co-host.
Connect

Latest posts by Christian Mohn (see all)

16 thoughts on “Installing and configuring VMware vCenter Operations”

  1. Hi, I have a problem when I try to open the web administration page. I can not access to vCenter Operations. It takes too long to respond and it shows the typical browser error “Internet Explorer can´t show the web page”.
    By the way, I can access to the Administration web page by including the port number at the end of the IP, for example https://x.x.x.x:5480. It is the vCenter Operations management web page.
    I don´t have a proxy but I can´t access the web admin page.
    I would really appreciate if you could help me with this problem.
    Thank you,

    Damian

      1. Thank you very much! I´m glad to tell you that PROBLEM 1 solution explained in that paper worked successfully.
        I´m sorry for my english. I´m from Argentina so I have to improve it a little more.
        Thank you again, you was very helpfull.

    1. @Damian: I recently ran into this issue … very frustrating.

      Found that even though documentation states that IE7, IE8, and Firefox are supported, you may get partial success with IE – such as being able to access the Appliance Administration page via IE but not the vCenter Operations Administration page via the same browser. I switched over to Firefox and was able to connect without problem.

  2. Thanks for this very simple but clear guide! It prompted me to get around to looking at this product, and I’m glad I did. I’ll be pushing my manager for a full license soon ;)

    1. @dboftlp: To be quite honest, no. I do have Operations running in my environment, but so far it hasn’t contributed much other than some great visuals. I’m sure there are features available that I haven’t tapped into yet, and I’ll be sure to post a followup when I have something new to add.

  3. Hi
    where do I edit the settings in VCOPS 5.0 to add email alerts? I’m able to send them out via Vcenter Server.

    also, how frequently do the the reporting tools get updated? when I run
    VCOPS undersized VM report it shows VM’s that are lacking in one way or another.So I fix one of them that says 100% memory undersized (4GB).. I double config’d memory for this VM to 8GB ..restart the VM, re-run the report with the ‘run now’ button,and it STILL shows the older data.when does that data get refreshed , and shouldn’t it be as soon as you click on the ‘run now’ button?
    thanks
    Rob

  4. Hi,

    I’m new to vCops and would like to dig deeper into it. We have a vCenter Operations Manager Version 5.0.1 installed. It was Working last month when I checked the vCOPS on the vSphere client. But now when I check back, it is giving me “this product is unlicensed or cannot connect to the vSphere Server”. I checked the licensing for the Operations Manager and it says that it says that the Capacity is 25 VMs and 37 VMs is assigned. I’m thinking this is a licensing problem so I decided to look for some resource on the web on how I can reduce the no. of VMs to monitor. I found this…http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2037573
    which points me to “Log in to the vCenter Operations Manager Admin UI at https:///admin as the admin user.”

    My problem now is I can’t access enter the Admin UI since the password endorsed by the one who set it up does not work. I’ve been trying to change the password for the Admin user as instructed here… (http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2001483) it changed it on the UI VM but I still could not enter the Admins UI https:///admin using the Admin username and password.

    Please help.

    Thanks,
    Mark J

Leave a Reply