vSAN 7 has finally been announced, and it comes with a good set of new features and improvements, here is a quick rundown of the highlights.

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I’m a big fan of Public Key authentication for SSH but I recently ran into an issue after adding my Public Key to a couple of new Linux VMs I use. The problem was that macOS kept asking for the SSH passphrase when connecting to them, which kind of defeats the purpose of using Public Key authentication in the first place. Thankfully, the solution is pretty simple.

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VMware has just announced the list of vExperts for 2020, and I’m honored to be awarded for the tenth year in a row! That being said, I’m happy to see the list of Norwegian vExperts grow! It wasn’t that many years ago that we were only two (or for the first couple of years, only one!), now the count is at 12!

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My audio setup is a old NAD 326 BEE stereo amplifier with a couple of Dali Blue 5005 speakers. I also have a turntable connected to it, and it sounds beautiful. The solution for enabling streaming to an old (but awesome!) amp, was using the Raspberry Pi 3 B+ I had laying around. I added a HiFiBerry DAC+ HAT to it, and enclosed it in a nice little case that also comes from HifiBerry.

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Since moving this site over to Hugo back in 2018, I’ve developed a workflow that seems to work pretty well. Given that I see that a lot of others are also moving over to static site generators, and I wasn’t exactly ahead of the curve on it myself, I figured I would try to write up how I work with Hugo and Visual Studio Code on my MacBook to generate content.

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Some times there is a need to use custom DNS servers for some domains, in my case specifically for access to the new lab environment we are building at work (more on that later, this is one beefy lab!) One way of doing this, is adding custom DNS servers to /etc/resolv.conf but in macOS you really shouldn’t be editing that file manually, as it often gets overwritten or otherwise edited by VPN clients and such. Thankfully, there is a better way to create persistent and manageable custom domain specific DNS settings.

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I recently got a pair of new displays for the office, a couple of lovely Dell U2719DC’s. These offer USB-C connectivity, which is really nice, and makes it easy to connect my MacBook when I’m in the office. Connected to one of the displays is a Logitech Z337 set of speakers with a sub, since there is no built-in speakers in these displays. The problem I had with that setup, is that macOS doesn’t let me easily differenciate between the two as they are named exactly the same, sometimes creating confusion as to which of them should be the sound output to the speakers.

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Way back in 2017, the CA/Browser Forum voted on Ballot 193 – 825-day Certificate Lifetimes, which passed. In short, this means that CA issued certificates issued after March 1st 2018 can not have a validity period longer than 825 days. macOS Catalina implements this change, as described in Requirements for trusted certificates in iOS 13 and macOS 10.15. So it’s been a long time coming, but most of us are just now realizing how this affects us.

Warning: This also applies to Self-signed certificates, like the ones issued for VMware vSphere and related solutions, like NSX-T and others, where the default age is 10 years or so.

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As I’ve covered before, I run my home network mostly on Ubiquiti UniFi hardware. Since this offers a lot of nifty possibilities, I figured I should try to isolate all my “IoT”-devices in a separate network, while still making them accessible. After all, you don’t want a security issue on some sensor/automation thing you have in your house to be able to access and encrypt your familiy photos, right? The thing that sits in the corner and controls the color of your lightbulbs, do not need to have access to the same network as your other data.

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Some times you might need to create an isolated network, while still allowing that network to access the internet. Ubiquity UniFi offers the easy option of creating a guest network for this, but that limits traffic between the devices in the same network as well, which might not be desirable. My primary use case for creating an isolated network, is to provide my tenant with his own dedicated network, without exposing anything on my own home network — but I still want him to be able to connect his own devices to each other, if he wants to — or even replacing the AP with something else, should he choose to do so. Another use case might be to create a dedicated network for all of those IoT-devices that keep popping up, like Amazon Echo’s, Google Home and Chromecasts as well as Phillips Hue bridges etc.

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About the author

Christian Mohn works as a Chief Technologist SDDC for Proact in Norway.

See his About page for more details, or find him on Twitter.

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